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The contents of this report reflect the views of the author(s), who is responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the data presented herein. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the Virginia Department of Transportation, the Commonwealth Transportation Board, or the Federal Highway Administration. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. Any inclusion of manufacturer names, trade names, or trademarks is for identification purposes only and is not to be considered an endorsement.

Title:

Diagnosis, Referral, and Rehabilitation Within the Fairfax Alcohol Safety Action Project, 1974
Authors:
Cheryl W. Lynn
Year: 1975
VTRC No.: 76-R26
Abstract: This report is a combination of Analytic Study #5 (Diagnosis and Referral) and Analytic Study #6 (Rehabilitation). Data concerning these countermeasures are presented together because of their very close relationship within the Fairfax ASAP. Both the diagnosis and referral, and the rehabilitation systems are described and statistics concerning their operations during 1974 presented. Distributions of demographic and alcohol related variables are compared in relation to drinker type, treatment referral, rehabilitation status (complete vs. drop), and recidivism. A multiple discriminant function analysis is presented which yields (1) a less than comprehensive function for discriminating between drinker classifications, and (2) a more complete function discriminating among referrals. The analysis shows that increased discriminability among referrals is due to the strong influence made upon the referral decision by the drinker diagnosis, which is entered as an additional variable. Crash involvement and recidivism rates for various drinker types and treatment referrals are given. Recidivism rates for persons not referred to treatment are shown to be significantly higher than rates for those persons who were referred, with no differences in rates being shown for modalities when controlling for drinker type and exposure. Knowledge scores for persons attending the various modalities which make up treatment Type I, alcohol related driver education, are examined. This analysis yields results similar to previous findings concerning DIS knowledge scores in all respects except one: in 1974, the Weekend Driver Improvement Schools imparted knowledge to students at least as effectively as did the non-weekend programs.