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The contents of this report reflect the views of the author(s), who is responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the data presented herein. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the Virginia Department of Transportation, the Commonwealth Transportation Board, or the Federal Highway Administration. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. Any inclusion of manufacturer names, trade names, or trademarks is for identification purposes only and is not to be considered an endorsement.

Title:

Design of High-performance Concrete Mixtures and Test Beams for a Bridge in Virginia
Authors:
Jose P. Gomez
H. Celik Ozyildirim
H. Celik Ozyildirim
Year: 1995
VTRC No.: 96-R27
Abstract: The main objective of this study was to develop concretes with a compressive strength of 69 to 83 MPa (10,000 to 12,000 psi) at 28 days and a high early release strength (within 20 hr) exceeding 70% of the 28-day strength. The properties of the high-performance concretes (HPC) tested included compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting tensile strength, and permeability. Four prestressed concrete AASHTO Type II beams were fabricated with HPC at a prestressing plant and load tested to failure. This test program was undertaken to support the field application of HPC in Virginia. Results showed that high-strength and low-permeability air-entrained mixtures could be designed. Concretes with a 28-day strength exceeding 69 MPa (10,000 psi), a minimum release strength of 70% of the 28-day strength, and coulomb values below 1,500 at 28 days can be produced with a water-cementitious material ratio (W/CM) of about 0.30 or below. Achieving such a low W/CM requires large amounts of cementitious material, proper selection of aggregates, and high dosages of high-range water-reducing admixtures. Thorough mixing is necessary, and good construction practices must be followed during placement, consolidation, and curing. To achieve high early strengths, proper temperature management is also needed.