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The contents of this report reflect the views of the author(s), who is responsible for the facts and the accuracy of the data presented herein. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the Virginia Department of Transportation, the Commonwealth Transportation Board, or the Federal Highway Administration. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. Any inclusion of manufacturer names, trade names, or trademarks is for identification purposes only and is not to be considered an endorsement.

Title:

Development of Safety Performance Functions for Two-Lane Roads Maintained by the Virginia Department of Transportation
Authors:
Hass, Phillip R.
Gosse, Conrad
Nicholas J. Garber
Year: 2010
VTRC No.: 10-R25
Abstract:

In recent years, significant effort and money have been invested to enhance highway safety.  As available funds decrease, the allocation of resources for safety improvement projects must yield the maximum possible return on investment.  Identifying highway locations that have the highest potential for crash reduction with the implementation of effective safety countermeasures is therefore an important first step in achieving the maximum return on safety investment.

This study was undertaken to develop safety performance functions (SPFs) for use in Virginia in conjunction with SafetyAnalyst?, a computerized analytical tool that can be used for prioritizing safety projects.  A safety performance function is a mathematical relationship (model) between frequency of crashes by severity and the most significant causal factors of crashes for a specific type of road.  Although the SafetyAnalyst User’s Manual recommends four SPFs for two-lane segments, these SPFs were developed using data from Ohio.  Because the transferability of these SPFs to other states could not be guaranteed by the developers of the four recommended SPFs, it is necessary to calibrate or develop valid SPFs for each state using appropriate data from the state.

In this study, annual average daily traffic (AADT) was used as the most significant causal factor for crashes, emulating the SPFs currently suggested by Safety Analyst.  SPFs for two-lane roads in Virginia were developed for total crashes and combined fatal plus injury crashes through generalized linear modeling using a negative binomial distribution for the crashes.  Models were developed for urban and rural areas separately, and in order to account for the different topographies in Virginia, SPFs were also separately developed for three regions in Virginia.  A total of 139,635 sites were identified for use in this study.  Each site is a segment of a rural or urban two-lane road without an intersection for which AADT data were available for the years 2003 through 2007 inclusive and no change in facility type had occurred over that period.  A comparative analysis based on the Freeman-Tukey R2 coefficient was then conducted between the relevant Ohio SPFs suggested for use in the SafetyAnalyst User’s Manual and those specifically developed in this study for Virginia to determine which set of models better fit the Virginia data.  In general, the results indicated that the SPFs specifically developed for Virginia fit the Virginia data better.

The final step in this methodology was to illustrate the value of SPFs developed through an analysis of sample sites and the need of the sites for safety improvement based on SPFs as compared to crash rates.  The results indicated that prioritization using the empirical Bayes method that incorporates the SPFs resulted in a higher potential for reduction in crashes than did prioritization using crash rates.

The effective use of SafetyAnalyst will facilitate the identification of sites with a high potential for safety improvement, which, in turn, with the implementation of appropriate safety improvements, will result in a considerable reduction in crashes and their severity.